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Twisted Justice, by Dianne Post: a review
By Jean Esplin
  Phoenix attorney Dianne Post's first  book of fiction Twisted Justice is set in 1986 Phoenix and
describes what happens to Angie after she is attacked by three men and kills two of them, wounding
the third. She is charged with assault murder, threatened with losing her nursing license and put on
administrative leave without pay. She also sees, for the first time, a side of Phoenix she had not
known existed.
  The social issues Post describes in her novel are as valid today as they were in 1986. Phoenix is
still one of the most economically and racially segregated cities in the country. Crossing the Salt River
is a journey to another world. Post's novel makes me remember my years in the early 1990s working
as a substitute teacher for the Roosevelt School District, the district that covers most of south
Phoenix. At one time or another, I spent time at all of the elementary schools that existed in south
Phoenix at the time, although most of my time was spent at a school at Broadway and 24th Street in
the center of one of the most gang and drug ridden neighborhoods in the city. I remember being
shocked by schools that lacked things I would have considered basic, such as libraries and
playground equipment. I remember being followed down the street by gang members asking me if I
wanted to buy drugs or if I wanted to make money by going to a motel with a man. South Phoenix is a
different, separate world.
  Much of Post's novel deals with the economic and social impact of growing up in that world, where
so many African American men, now and then, spend time in prison, and it is shockingly easy for the
pleasant, friendly boys I taught in elementary school to drift into drugs, gangs and crime. Post deals
with the real impact this world has on American society, both in poor, urban minority neighborhood
and in society at large.
  She also looks at the discrimination that women face then and now in our society. At a time when
the issue of women's access to something so basic as birth control is being fought before the
Supreme Court, women need to realize that the rights won for us by previous generations of feminists
are not guaranteed.
  In
Twisted Justice, Angie meets with a group of feminists and confronts the reality that she is facing
capitol charges as a result of situation where a man would have been considered a hero. Police, the
district attorney, and Phoenix society in general cannot believe that a woman would have been able to
successfully fight off three attackers in the way Angie did. She also listens as some of the woman
describe economic and sexual injustice resulting from their being women, something she had not
realized existed.
  
Twisted Justice also deals with Angie's relationship with her attorney, an African American woman
who faces scorn not only from the African American community in general, but also from members of
her own family, for defending a white woman against an African American perpetrator
  In the end, Angie saves the life of her perpetrator and is able to forgive him and reach a catharsis
about the attack; but, when her charges are finally dropped, she realized that she has still spent
thousands of dollars and damaged her reputation and her career in fighting criminal charges that
should never has existed at all.
  
Twisted Justice deals with social issues that are as real today as they were in 1986. It is an
excellent read that will make the reader think about a side of our society that they may not have ever
known existed.
  Phoenix attorney Dianne Post's first  book of fiction
Twisted Justice is set in 1986 Phoenix and
describes what happens to Angie after she is attacked by three men and kills two of them, wounding
the third. She is charged with assault murder, threatened with losing her nursing license and put on
administrative leave without pay. She also sees, for the first time, a side of Phoenix she had not
known existed.
  The social issues Post describes in her novel are as valid today as they were in 1986. Phoenix is
still one of the most economically and racially segregated cities in the country. Crossing the Salt River
is a journey to another world. Post's novel makes me remember my years in the early 1990s working
as a substitute teacher for the Roosevelt School District, the district that covers most of south
Phoenix. At one time or another, I spent time at all of the elementary schools that existed in south
Phoenix at the time, although most of my time was spent at a school at Broadway and 24th Street in
the center of one of the most gang and drug ridden neighborhoods in the city. I remember being
shocked by schools that lacked things I would have considered basic, such as libraries and
playground equipment. I remember being followed down the street by gang members asking me if I
wanted to buy drugs or if I wanted to make money by going to a motel with a man. South Phoenix is a
different, separate world.
  Much of Post's novel deals with the economic and social impact of growing up in that world, where
so many African American men, now and then, spend time in prison and it is shockingly easy for the
pleasant, friendly boys I taught in elementary school to drift into drugs, gangs and crime. Post deals
with the real impact this world has on American society, both in poor, urban minority neighborhood
and in society at large.
  She also looks at the discrimination that women face then and now in our society. At a time when
the issue of women's access to something so basic as birth control is being fought before the
Supreme Court, women need to realize that the rights won for us by previous generations of feminists
are not guaranteed.
 
 In Twisted Justice, Angie meets with a group of feminists and confronts the reality that she is facing
capitol charges as a result of situation where a man would have been considered a hero. Police, the
district attorney and Phoenix society in general cannot believe that a woman would have been able to
successfully fight off three attackers in the way Angie did. She also listens as some of the woman
describe economic and sexual injustice resulting from their being women, something she had not
realized existed.
  Twisted Justice also deals with Angie's relationship with her attorney, an African American woman
who faces scorn not only from the African American community in general, but also from members of
her own family, for defending a white woman against an African American perpetrator
  In the end, Angie saves the life of her perpetrator and is able to forgive him and reach a catharsis
about the attack; but, when her charges are finally dropped, she realized that she has still spent
thousands of dollars and damaged her reputation and her career in fighting criminal charges that
should never has existed at all.
  Twisted Justice deals with social issues that are as real today as they were in 1986. It is an
excellent read that will make the reader think about a side of our society that they may not have ever
known existed.  
Blood and honor, by Dianne Post: a review
    Blood and Honor, by Phoenix author Dianne Post, opens a window into the racism
and hate that still blots the American landscape. The book follows the experiences of
three generations of German American women in the 20th century, beginning with
Grete, whose German language newspaper was destroyed during World War I because
of English First bias against anyone who spoke or wrote in German.
    Her daughter Trude is torn between loyalty to the United States and her love for a
man she believes to be a German Nazi. She spies of the Nazi for the FBI but also
becomes pregnant by him. Her daughter Darian is the result of that union. As Trude's
political career blossoms, she finds herself being blackmailed for 20 years over the
affair by a man who ultimately is proven to be a Nazi collaborator and a mass murderer.
    It up to Darian, a young lesbian newspaper reporter whose partner is Jewish, to
finally put together all the pieces of the puzzle and ensure that her mother's blackmailer
is finally deported and faces justice for his crimes.
    In an era with the first Black president, it is easy to think that the kind of racial and
ethnic hatred depicted in Post's novel, is no longer an issues. However, as Post points
out in her epilogue, as of 2010 there were 926 hate groups listed in the United States
and Nazi war criminals were found in the United States decades after their crimes. In
some cases, even their own spouses didn't know their true history.
    Hate continues, although most people in the United States know that it is not socially
acceptable to openly express it in the same way they might have 40 or 50 years ago.
Many believe that the reason the Tea Party has so virulently opposed Barack Obama is
that Obama is black. Police racial profiling lives and patently unconstitutional laws
discriminating against minorities continue to be passed. The recent Arizona law allowing
businesses to discriminate against groups their religion objects to was vetoed, but a
similar law was passed in Mississippi. Women continue to fight for reproductive rights
that they believed had been guaranteed for decades.
    Hate lives and it is not just GLBT people, women and racial and ethnic minorities
that suffer. I opened my news feed this morning to see that a young man with Downs
Syndrome died after a struggle with police over a $10 movie ticket. In the small town in
New Mexico where I once lived two men diagnosed with schizophrenia were released
from the state hospital to guardians who charged them $1,100 a month to live a in a
storage shed in the back yard. They had no plumbing and only plastic on the windows.
The only power was provided by an extension cord from the house and the two men
died this month after asphyxiating from fumes from an improperly installed gas heater.
The residential arrangement was approved by a social worker at the state hospital. No
one from the local outpatient program had bothered to check on how the two men were
living.
    Everyone deserves the right to a decent life and until we accept the humanity of all
people, hate will continue to destroy lives. Post's book provides a realistic and relevant
look at what hate and prejudice can do in the lives of real people.